The RPattz Club, Forum du site Therpattzrobertpattinson.blogspot.fr
 
Accueilhttp://therpattzrobertpattinson.blogspot.fr/CalendrierFAQS'enregistrerConnexion

Partagez | 
 

 [Little Ashes] Critiques

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
Aller à la page : Précédent  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Suivant
AuteurMessage
admin
Administratrice
Administratrice


Nombre de messages : 16344
Date d'inscription : 12/03/2009

MessageSujet: Re: [Little Ashes] Critiques   Ven 15 Mai - 18:43

bonjour le parti pris. rien que cette phrase discrédite tout le reste de la critique vu qu'elle est sans fondement.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://www.rpattzrobertpattinson.com
admin
Administratrice
Administratrice


Nombre de messages : 16344
Date d'inscription : 12/03/2009

MessageSujet: Re: [Little Ashes] Critiques   Ven 22 Mai - 5:41

A crush overwhelms a tale worth telling 2 Stars

Apparently, movie viewers in San Francisco's gay Castro District responded to Brokeback Mountain as if it were a comedy, refusing to accept that a story of cowboys in love was a tragedy. Those same folks might actually hurt themselves laughing watching Little Ashes , a distressed account of Salvador Dali and Federico Garcia Lorca's schoolboy romance.

You might think that a painter and poet being gay is hardly news. Yet Little Ashes treats the Lorca-Dali affair with trembling wonder. The film opens in a Madrid university. Handsome, exquisitely dressed Lorca (Javier Beltran) and best friend Luis Bunuel (Matthew McNulty) lounge in dormitories with smart-set friends, smoking unfiltered cigarettes and reciting poetry. At night, the beautiful and the damned adjourn to nightclubs, where they drink too much and curse fascism.

Then a beyond-strange stranger arrives, dressed and looking like Zelda Fitzgerald – Salvador Dali (Robert Pattinson). Except that there isn't a teddy bear in sight, we could be at Hertford College, in Oxford, with Charles Ryder and Sebastian Flyte, in Evelyn Waugh's Brideshead Revisited .

But whereas Waugh used the romance of Charles and Sebastian to make readers sense the overripe-garden decay of English society, British filmmaker Paul Morrison ( Solomon and Gaenor ) examines Lorca and Dali's tangled affair to tell a Tragic Love Story.

Tragic Love Stories, especially those involving college students, should be told in the past tense, with strong drink in hand. But Morrison and screenwriter Philippa Goslett want us to feel the heat of youthful desire. And so we have a late-night scene of Lorca tucking in his gorgeous painter friend, then retiring to his own room, falling to his knees, begging God to cure his fever. Later, the students assemble a driftwood crucifix on a beach, and then destroy it – casting aside religion – before leaping naked into the pounding surf.

What a lot of fuss and feathers At times, it feels here like the filmmakers have made a movie out of Satan's Alley, the faux trailer in Tropic Thunder that has monastery monks exchanging meaningful glances while tickling each other's rosaries.

It's too bad that director Morrison is so determined to break our hearts with the story of Lorca's impetuous crush on Dali, because it overwhelms the rest of his story. Lorca's attempt to mobilize his countrymen against Republican fascists in the Spanish Civil War is reduced to the intermittent reciting of impassioned poetry.

The film also wastes several strong performances. Beltran makes a charismatic Lorca, and Pattinson, the dreamy vampire in Twilight , survives all Dali's costume and hair changes, including the unlikely longhorn-antler mustache he wears in the film's final third. More intriguing still is McNulty ( Control ) as filmmaker Bunuel, an artist in a hurry to talk about politics and public monsters because he is afraid to confront personal demons.

Some have complained that Little Ashes has been ruined because it is Federico Garcia Lorca's life told in English. That's not true. Morrison's film is Lorca's love life – every poet's second career – badly explained.

Anyone interested in hearing the artist's heart-to-hearts properly translated is encouraged to seek out Leonard Cohen's flamenco serenade, Take This Waltz .

Special to The Globe and Mail
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://www.rpattzrobertpattinson.com
admin
Administratrice
Administratrice


Nombre de messages : 16344
Date d'inscription : 12/03/2009

MessageSujet: Re: [Little Ashes] Critiques   Ven 22 Mai - 6:07

Little Ashes

By Kevin Harper

Shot with the lushness of the early Merchant-Ivory works, British director Paul Morrison's Little Ashes traces the genius of early 20th century Spanish surrealists down to good old-fashioned romance, betrayal and heartache.

Centred mainly upon the barely post-teenage Salvador Dali (Robert Pattison) as he enters university in Madrid, where he quickly draws the attention of poet Federico Garcia Lorca (Javier Beltrán) and filmmaker Luis Bunuel (Matthew McNulty). When Bunuel sets off to conquer France with his groundbreaking cinematic dreamscapes, Dali and Lorca intensify their friendship until it explodes into romance, infecting the seminal works of each man. There are a few moving scenes of the artist at work — Dali literally throwing his entire body into his paintings, as well as Lorca's prose flowing into the voiceovers.

Morrison keeps telling the audience about these two intertwined souls destined to make beautiful art together but the spark never really translates to the audience. As such, much of the film feels rote, with the impassioned works of the characters chalked up as mere products of generic heartache. The rampant homophobia of Spain during the era is addressed but even with archival news footage incorporated into the action the very genuine threat feels almost tame in its bluster.

However, with Hispanic heartthrob appeal the movie will no doubt appeal to the masses becoming accustomed to hot hunk-on-hunk action (represented by the positive notices for Brokeback Mountain and Milk). Pattinson in particular comes as a built-in draw for Twilight fans; his alternately sullen and expressive character spasms show an actor desperate to make an impression, even if exactly what impression is never quite clear.

The graceful maturity adopted for gay love scenes now is certainly appreciated but the dynamic between the two men always feels just short of passionate. (Kinosmith)

exclaim.ca
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://www.rpattzrobertpattinson.com
ptiteaurel
Administratrice
Administratrice
avatar

Nombre de messages : 38566
Date d'inscription : 13/03/2009
Age : 37
Localisation : Arras

MessageSujet: Re: [Little Ashes] Critiques   Ven 22 Mai - 13:53

Bon là je suis au boulot jusque 16h mais dès que je rentre je m'y met et vous aurez ça en fin d'après midi lol!

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
pluie-etoile
Modote
Modote
avatar

Nombre de messages : 796
Date d'inscription : 27/03/2009
Age : 40
Localisation : Nice

MessageSujet: Re: [Little Ashes] Critiques   Ven 22 Mai - 14:29

interro surprise ptite aurel comme ca t'as le temps de faire les traducs!!! lol!
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
ptiteaurel
Administratrice
Administratrice
avatar

Nombre de messages : 38566
Date d'inscription : 13/03/2009
Age : 37
Localisation : Arras

MessageSujet: Re: [Little Ashes] Critiques   Ven 22 Mai - 18:07

TRADUCTION

Un coup de foudre prend le dessus sur une histoire qu'on aurait aimé connaître concernant ces 2 stars

Apparemment les spectateurs gays du Castro District de san Francisco on t considéré Brokeback Mountain comme une comédie refusant d'accepter une histoire de cow boys amoureux et leur tragédie . Ces mêmes gars pourraient aussi se marrer en regardant Little Ashes , un récit bouleversé de la romance universitaire de Salvador Dali et Federico Garcia Lorca.

Vous pourriez penser qu'un peintre et un poète gays ce n'est pas innovateur . Pourtant Little Ashes traite la relation Lorca-Dali avec un émerveillement ému Le film s'ouvre sur une université à Madrid . Beau et superbement vêtu , Lorca (Javier Beltran) et son meillluer ami Luis Bunuel (Matthew McNulty) logent dans des dortoirs avec un groupe d'amis huppés, fumant des cigarettes sans filtres et récitant de la poèsie. La nuit , ces belles et damnées personnes se rendent dans des nightclubs, où ils boivent trop et maudissent le fascisme

C'est alors qu'un étranger tout à fait étrange arrive, habillé comme Zelda Fitzgerald – Salvador Dali (Robert Pattinson). Sauf qu'il n'y a pas de nounours en vue, nous pourrions être à Hertford College, ià Oxford, avec Charles Ryder et Sebastian Flyte, dans une nouvelle adaptation de Brideshead d' Evelyn Waugh .

Mais alors que Waugh utilisait la romance de Charles et Sebastian pour permettre aux lecteurs de ressentir la décadence de la société anglaise , le réalisateur Britannique Paul Morrison ( Solomon and Gaenor ) examine la difficile relation de Lorca et Dali' pour narrer une tragique histoire d'amour .

Les histoires d'amour tragiques , tout particulièrement si elles concernent les étudiants, devraient ^tre racontées au passé avec un bon verre à la main. Mais Morrison et le scénariste Philippa Goslett veulent nous faire sentir la sensualité du plaisir juvénile. Et donc nous avons un bain de minuit où Lorca flirte avec son bel ami peintre, puis se retirant dans sa chambre , tombant à genoux implorant Dieu de soigner son mal . Plus tard, les étudiants assemblent un crucifix en bois sur la plage avant de le détruire , mettant ainsi de côté la religion – avant de se jeter nu dans un ressac de vagues.

Beaucoup trop de froufrou et de plumes Par moments , on dirait que les réalisateurs ont fait un film à partir de Satan's Alley, tle faux trailer dans Tropic Thunder dans lequel des moines échangent des regards qui en disent long tout en se tripotant les rosaires.

C'est bien dommage que le réalisateur Morrison soit si déterminé à nous briser le coeur avec l'histoire de l'impétueux coup de foudre de Lorca pour Dali, car cela prend le dessus sur le reste de l'histoire. La tentative de Lorca à mobiliser ses compatriotes contre les fascistes Républicains dans une Espagne en pleine guerre civile est réduite au récit entre coupé de poésie passionnée .

Le film gâche aussi de nombreuses fortes performances. Beltran fait un Lorca charismatique , et Pattinson, le vampire dont on rêve dans Twilight , survit à tous les costumes et changements capillaires de Dali', incluant la moustache atypique qu'il porte dans la 3ème partie du film. Plus intriguant encore est McNulty ( Control ) dans le rôle du réalisateur Bunuel,un artiste pressé de parler politique et de monstres publics car il a peur de faire face à ses démons personnels.

Certains se sont plaint disant que Little Ashes a été ruiné par le fait que la vie de Federico Garcia Lorca est raconté en Anglais . Ce n'est pas vrai . C'est l'histoire d'amour de Lorca dans le film de Morrison – la seconde carrière de tout poète – qui est très mal expliquée

Quiconque serait intéressé par les sentiments de l'artiste bien retranscris est encouragé à chercher un flamenco de Leonard Cohen, prenez cette valse .

Special to The Globe and Mail

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
ptiteaurel
Administratrice
Administratrice
avatar

Nombre de messages : 38566
Date d'inscription : 13/03/2009
Age : 37
Localisation : Arras

MessageSujet: Re: [Little Ashes] Critiques   Ven 22 Mai - 18:30

TRADUCTION


Little Ashes

By Kevin Harper

Tourné avec la luxure des travaux Merchant-Ivory , le réalisateur Britannique Paul Morrison et son Little Ashes retrace le génie de surréalistes espagnols du début du 20ème siècle pour en faire une romance démodée, teintée de trahison et de maux de tête.

Centré principalement sur l'adolescent Salvador Dali (Robert Pattison) alors qu'il entre à l'université de Madrid, où il va rapidement attiré l'attention du poète Federico Garcia Lorca (Javier Beltrán) et du réalisateur Luis Bunuel (Matthew McNulty). Quand Bunuel est parti à la conquête de la France avec ses rêves cinématographique, Dali et Lorca ont renforcé leur amitié jusqu'à la transformer en romance, contaminait le travail de chaque homme. Il y a peu de scènes émouvantes sur l'artiste au travail — Dali se jetant corps et âme dans la peinture , tout comme la prose de Lorca inondant les auditeurs.

Morrison ne cesse de dire au public que ces 2 âmes se sont entremêlées pour accomplir leur destin: travailler ensemble mais l'étincelle n'a jamais jailli aux yeux du public. De ce fait , la majorité du film a un goût de déjà vu, avec le travail sans passion des personnages dessinés ici comme de simples produits de blessures au coeur. L'homophobie rampante en espagne durant cette période est montrée mais même en y incorporant de nouvelles scènes l'action semble être complètement contenue.

Cependant avec les tombeurs Hispaniques qui sont l'attraction le film attirera sans aucun doute les foules habituées aux scènes d'action entre bellâtres (représenté par les films positifs comme Brokeback Mountain et Milk). Pattinson en particulier attirera les fans de Twilight ; son personnage expressif et maussade montre qu'il est un acteur désespéré de faire bonne impression, même si l'impression n'est pas toujours très clair.

La maturité pleine de grâce adoptée par les scènes d'amour homosexuelles est désormais apprécié mais la dynamisme entre les 2 hommes manquent un peu de passion. (Kinosmith)

exclaim.ca

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
ptiteaurel
Administratrice
Administratrice
avatar

Nombre de messages : 38566
Date d'inscription : 13/03/2009
Age : 37
Localisation : Arras

MessageSujet: Re: [Little Ashes] Critiques   Ven 22 Mai - 19:16

heu c'est quoi ce style??

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
ptiteaurel
Administratrice
Administratrice
avatar

Nombre de messages : 38566
Date d'inscription : 13/03/2009
Age : 37
Localisation : Arras

MessageSujet: Re: [Little Ashes] Critiques   Ven 22 Mai - 19:50

Ah ok j'avais lu les bouquins mais pas vu les films et oui effectivement tout est dans la retenue
pour ces explications

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
ptiteaurel
Administratrice
Administratrice
avatar

Nombre de messages : 38566
Date d'inscription : 13/03/2009
Age : 37
Localisation : Arras

MessageSujet: Re: [Little Ashes] Critiques   Ven 29 Mai - 19:44

Critique du Washington Times du 29.05

Teenage girls — or their mothers — drawn to "Little Ashes" by the prospect of devouring with their eyes brooding "Twilight" star Robert Pattinson have a few surprises in store — tortured sexuality, life-and-death politics and a sliced eyeball, for starters.

That last image is from Luis Bunuel's 1929 surrealistic classic "Un chien andalou," which the director co-wrote with painter Salvador Dali. Together, the two helped change the language of film while still in their 20s.

Uglier things might have been brewing in 1920s Spain, but university life in Madrid was alive with possibility, as shown in the modest drama "Little Ashes." A student dormitory proves a productive creative laboratory, housing three friends who became legends — Dali, Bunuel and the doomed poet Federico Garcia Lorca.

"Little Ashes" focuses on the relationship between Dali and Lorca — much of it conjecture — but Bunuel clearly was the gang's leader at first. He coolly sizes up the new arrival, entering Dali's room uninvited and examining his work. "Hiding all this brilliance isn't very neighborly, you know," he says, and it's clear he has decided to accept Dali into the group.

The painter had a flair for the dramatic — and self-aggrandizement — even as a teenager. While everyone else discusses Spain's future over tea in suits and ties, Dali dresses like a man from another century.

"Interests?" Bunuel asks. "Dada, anarchy, the construction of genius," Dali replies. "Whose?" "My own." So Bunuel introduces him to "another self-titled genius," the already-published Lorca. Lorca's and Dali's passion for each other soon disgusts Bunuel.

Lorca fights his attraction to the singular artist, praying in front of a statue of the Virgin Mary. He soon gives in, however — and Dali seems receptive. Lorca tries to take things too far for the delicate Dali, though. It seems as if these three collaborators might never even speak to one another again. Dali rekindles his friendship with Bunuel, though, and the Andalusian poet sees "Un chien andalou" as a direct attack. He throws himself into his work — and the fight against the fascists — with terrible results.

The film's emphasis on the personal relationships comes at the expense of the professional. Dali was a visionary, but we never discover how he actually created himself. We get little sense of Bunuel's vision, either. Here, the director of "L'Age d'or" comes off as a rather obtuse reactionary.

Still, these men are engaging enough to carry the film on their own. Matthew McNulty is commanding as Bunuel, but the sensitive Javier Beltran consistently steals the show as the tormented Lorca. Mr. Pattinson has taken on a much bigger challenge than playing a vampire — bringing a legend to life. He does an admirable job playing one of the strangest and most imaginative men to walk the earth. He's shy and trembling when he arrives at the dorm, bombastic and determined when he leaves it. The transformation is striking

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
ptiteaurel
Administratrice
Administratrice
avatar

Nombre de messages : 38566
Date d'inscription : 13/03/2009
Age : 37
Localisation : Arras

MessageSujet: Re: [Little Ashes] Critiques   Ven 29 Mai - 20:06

TRADUCTION

Les adolescentes — ou leur mères — dsont attirées par "Little Ashes" pour voir la star de "Twilight" Robert Pattinson a quelques surprises dans ses tiroirs— sexualité torturé, la politique et un oeil que l'on coupe, en entrée

La dernière image du "Un chien andalou,"de Luis Bunuel' en 1929 que le réalisateur a co écrit avec le peintre Salvador Dali. A eux deux ils ont changé les dialogues des films alors qu'ils n'avaient qu'un vingtaine d 'année.

D'autres choses plus moche se sont déroulés dans l'espagne des année 1920,mais la vie universitaire à Madrid rimait avec possibilité , comme le montre le modeste "Little Ashes." Un dortoir devient un laboratoire , où logent 3 amis qui deviendront des légendes— Dali, Bunuel et le poète malchanceux Federico Garcia Lorca.

"Little Ashes" se focalise sur la relation de Dali and Lorca mais Bunuel était clairement le leader du groupe dans un 1er temps. Il a secoué calmement le nouvel arrivant, entrant dans la chambre de Dali sans y avoir été invité et examinant ses ouevres. "Cacher toutes ces choses brillantes n'est pas propice à entretenir les relations entre voissins vous savez, ," dit il et il est évident qu'il a décidé d'accepter dali dans son clan.

Le peintre avait du flair pour le dramatique — et pour l'égo sur dimensionné— em^me adolescent. Alors que tout le monde parle de l'avenir de l'espagne autour d'un thé en costume cravate , Dali s'habille comme un homme d'un autre siècle

"des centres d'inérêts?" Bunuel lui demande. "Dada, anarchie, la constructiondu ,"répond Dali . "Lequel" "le mine." Donc Bunuel le présente "un autre génie auto proclamé "au déjà publié Lorca. La passion mutuelle de Lorca et Dali dégopute rapidement Bunuel.

Lorca combat son attirance pour ce simple artiste priant devant la statue de la Vierge Mariey. Cependant il succombe — et Dali ssemble receptif. Lorca tente de pousser les choses un peu trop loin pour le délicat Dali, m^me si on a l'impression que ces 3 collaborateurs ne se parlerons plus jamais de leur vies Dali enoue son amitié avec Bunuel, et le poète andalou voit le "Un chien andalou" comme una ttaque directe. Il se jette à cors perdu dans le travail — et sa lutte contre le fascisme— avec des résultats terribles.

L'emphase du film sur les relations personnelles est aux dépends de leur travail. Dali était un visionnaire, mais nous ne savosn pas comment il a crée son génie.Nous ne comprenons pas les visions de Bunuel non plus. Ici le réalisateur de "L'Age d'or" se montre comme un revolutionnaire obtus

cependant les acteurs mènent à terme le film. Matthew McNulty commande l'ensemble en tant que Bunuel, mais le sensible Javier Beltran lui vole constamment la vedette en interprétant Lorca. Mr. Pattinson a relevé un défi plus important ( par rapport à son rôle de vampire) — donnant vie à la légende Il fait un travail merveilleux en incarnant un des hommes les plus étranges et créatif. Il est timide; il tremble quand il arrive au dortoir, c'est une bombe et il est déterminé quand il le quitte La transformation est frappante

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
ptiteaurel
Administratrice
Administratrice
avatar

Nombre de messages : 38566
Date d'inscription : 13/03/2009
Age : 37
Localisation : Arras

MessageSujet: Re: [Little Ashes] Critiques   Ven 29 Mai - 20:09

Une autre critique du Washington post

A Middling Portrait of the Artists

Javier Beltrán, left, is believable as Spanish poet Federico García Lorca, but Robert Pattinson, who plays Salvador Dalí, is not. (Regent Releasing/here Media)

Have you seen the poster for "Little Ashes"? The one prominently featuring Robert Pattinson and his mustache staring off into space?

If so, you'd be forgiven for thinking of this as "the Salvador Dalí movie." After all, that's who the British star of "Twilight" plays here. But although Pattinson certainly looks the part of the eccentric, pop-eyed painter of melting clocks in this historical drama, set in pre-civil-war Spain of the 1920s and 1030s, his Dalí is a mess. He's all tics and mannerisms, with nothing underneath. And his Spanish accent sounds closer to Transylvanian.

Fortunately, the character at the center of this strange little film isn't Dalí at all, but Federico García Lorca. Spanish actor Javier Beltrán plays the poet and playwright with both soulfulness and passion. "Little Ashes" tells the controversial and speculative story of García Lorca's doomed love for Dalí.

Fact: García Lorca was gay. Fact: Dalí, who was known for his many sexual hang-ups, met the writer when both were in college in Madrid.

Director Paul Morrison and writer Philippa Goslett have taken those two little facts and run with them, assuming that there might have been a lot more to the relationship.

For most of his life, Dalí kept mum about the private details of his friendship with García Lorca, who was murdered, probably because of his homosexuality.

The most fascinating aspect of "Little Ashes" is the, er, exegesis it offers for the 1929 film "An Andalusian Dog." No one has ever really understood that groundbreaking short, made in collaboration between filmmaker Luis Buñuel (another college pal of García Lorca's) and Dalí.

The short is presented as a "Beavis and Butthead"-style goof perpetrated by Dalí and Buñuel at the expense of García Lorca.

According to "Little Ashes," Dalí became jealous over the sexual attentions of writer Magdalena (Marina Gatell) toward García Lorca. Buñuel, meanwhile, played by Brit Matthew McNulty, is depicted as a violent homophobe.


Beltrán, for his part, makes a solidly believable García Lorca. The problem is with the man with whom he's obsessed. In Pattinson's performance, we never see what García Lorca sees in Dalí.

What Pattinson never seems to get is that there must have been something beating beneath that mustache, mop of hair and awful, awful accent.


-- Michael O'Sullivan

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
ptiteaurel
Administratrice
Administratrice
avatar

Nombre de messages : 38566
Date d'inscription : 13/03/2009
Age : 37
Localisation : Arras

MessageSujet: Re: [Little Ashes] Critiques   Ven 29 Mai - 20:48

TRADUCTION


Un Portrait convenable des artistes

Javier Beltrán, , est crédible dans le rôle du poète Federico García Lorca, mais ce n'est pas le cas de Robert Pattinson, qui incarne Salvador Dalí,

Avez vous l'affiche de "Little Ashes"? Celle montrant Robert Pattinson et sa moustache venue de l'espace?

Si oui , on vous pardonnera de penser que c'est le film sur "Salvador Dalí." Après tout c'est bien lui que la star de Twilight incarne. Mais bien que Pattinson ressemble certainement au peintre axcentrique dans ce drame historique, situé dans l'espagne de l'avant guere civile des années 1920 et 1930, son Dalí est une merde. Il a des tics et des mannières,et rien sous les apparences. Et son accent espagnol est proche de l'accent Transylvanien.

Heureusement le personnage central de cet étrange film n'est pas Dalí , mais Federico García Lorca. L'acteur espagnol Javier Beltrán incarne le poète et le dramaturge de toute son âme et avec passion . "Little Ashes" raconte l'histoire contreversée et spéculative de l'amour voué à l'echec de García Lorca pour Dalí.

Les faits : García Lorca était gay . Les faits : Dalí, connu pour ses nombreuses aventures sexuelles , a rencontré l'écrivain quand il sétaient tous les 2 àla fac à Madrid.

Le réalisateur Paul Morrison aet le scénariste Philippa Goslett ont saisi ses 2 informations et en ont fait totu un roman , assumant que leur relation était bien plus intense qu'on ne voulait le dire.

Une grande partie de sa vie, Dalí a gardé sous silence les détails privés de son amitié avec García Lorca, qui a été assassiné , sans doute à cause de son homosexualité.

L'aspect le plus fascinant de "Little Ashes" c'est le , huh , exégèse qu'il offre pour le film "An Andalusian Dog." de 1929 . Personne n'a jamais rien compris de ce court métrage fait en collaboration entre le réalisateur Luis Buñuel (un autre étudaint du temps de García Lorca) et Dalí.

Ce film est présenté comme un "Beavis and Butthead"-style perpétré par Dalí et Buñuelaux dépends de García Lorca.

Selon "Little Ashes," Dalí est devenu jaloux des attentions sexuelles de l'écrivan Magdalena (Marina Gatell) tenvers García Lorca. Buñuel, pendant ce temps là , joué par la Brittanique Matthew McNulty, est décrit comme un homophobe violent.


Beltrán, pour sa part est incroyablement crédible en García Lorca. Le problème c'est la personne qui l'obssede. Dans la performance de Pattinson, nous ne voyons jamais García Lorca voit en Dalí.

Ce que Pattinson ne semble jamais comprendre c'est qu'il doit il y avoir quelquechose de percutant sous cette moustache, cette touffe de cheveu et cet accent si horriblement horrible.


-- Michael O'Sullivan

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
pluie-etoile
Modote
Modote
avatar

Nombre de messages : 796
Date d'inscription : 27/03/2009
Age : 40
Localisation : Nice

MessageSujet: Re: [Little Ashes] Critiques   Sam 30 Mai - 11:15

Quand les avis sont partagés ca veut dire en general que le film est bon!!! qu'il a provoqué des sentiments négatifs ou positifs
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
ptiteaurel
Administratrice
Administratrice
avatar

Nombre de messages : 38566
Date d'inscription : 13/03/2009
Age : 37
Localisation : Arras

MessageSujet: Re: [Little Ashes] Critiques   Jeu 4 Juin - 19:50

Little Ashes' looks at Dali-Lorca bond

Imagine an art-school classmates team of artist Salvador Dali, poet Federico Garcia Lorca and filmmaker Luis Bunuel. It happened in 1922 Madrid, three titans of 20th-century art, letters and film converging at the right place at the right time.

"Little Ashes" looks at this formidable trio, in a film set at a creatively volatile time in Spain's history, as young artists emerged challenging the status quo. Specifically, the film looks at the relationship this trio had, particularly the extremely strong bond between Lorca and Dali as they discovered themselves as soul mates, if only briefly.

With Javier Beltran and Robert Pattinson as Lorca and Dali, respectively, the film gives its characters an aura of mystique and quiet genius, though the film may actually become a little too quiet, a little too precious, to showcase the volcanic forces of their talent. The sexual relationship long rumored between the two is more than hinted at, but not as important to the film as that elusive mystique they shared.

The film, with the characters speaking in English, is a visually striking curiosity without an abundance of adrenaline, though fans of the trio may find themselves drawn in.

"Little Ashes" opens Friday for one week only at the Ken Cinema in San Diego.

Source north county times

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
ptiteaurel
Administratrice
Administratrice
avatar

Nombre de messages : 38566
Date d'inscription : 13/03/2009
Age : 37
Localisation : Arras

MessageSujet: Re: [Little Ashes] Critiques   Jeu 4 Juin - 20:03

TRADUCTION

Little Ashe : un regard sur le lien entre Dali et Lorca

Imaginez des camarades de classe dans une école d'art : l'artiste Salvador Dali, le poète Federico Garcia Lorca et le réalisateur Luis Bunuel. Ca s'est passé à Madrid en 1922; 3 monstres de l'art , des lettres et du cinéma au 20ème siècle, arrivant au même endroit au même moment.

"Little Ashes" jete un regard sur ce formidable trio, dans un film à une époque créativement volatile de l'histoire espagnole, alors que ces jeunes artistes émergent tout juste défiants le status quo. Précisement le film montre la relation de ce trio, en particulier le lien extrémement fort entre Lorca et Dali tandis qu'ils découvrent que ce sont des âmes soeurs , un bref instant.

Avec Javier Beltran et Robert Pattinson en Lorca et Dali, le film donne à ses personnages une aura de mystère et de génie paisible gives , même si le film est peut être un peu trop calme, un peu trop précieux,pour montrer les forces volcaniques de leur talent . La rumeur longuement entretenue sur leur relations sexuelles est vaguement évoquée , mais n'est pas aussi importante dans le film que le mystère élusif qu'ils ont partagé .

Le film, avec ses personnages parlant anglais , est une curiosité visuelle , avec une abondance d'adrénaline , même si les fans du trio risque d'être pris de court.

"Little Ashes" sort vendredi pour une semaine seulement au Ken Cinema de San Diego.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
admin
Administratrice
Administratrice


Nombre de messages : 16344
Date d'inscription : 12/03/2009

MessageSujet: Re: [Little Ashes] Critiques   Sam 13 Juin - 10:14

Review: Little Ashes
By Jay Stone

The beginnings of surrealist sensibility meet what used to be quaintly called the love that dares not whisper its name -- thus proving that, for Salvador Dali at least, it wasn't all limp pocket watches -- in Paul Morrison's Little Ashes, the story of Federico Garcia Lorca, Dali and Luis Bunuel and their tempestuous youth.

Lorca, Dali and Bunuel might not be as well known today as they should be, but once upon a time they were the latest thing in art, and in 1922 Spain, they were positively scandalous. Lorca (newcomer Javier Beltran) was already a famous poet -- Canadians may know him best as one of Leonard Cohen's muses (his "Little Viennese Waltz" became Cohen's song "Take This Waltz") -- and was palling around with Bunuel (Matthew McNulty), soon to be an avant-garde filmmaker who would move to Mexico and then Paris, and make such movies as Diary of a Chambermaid and The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie.

The movie begins with the arrival in Madrid of Dali (Robert Pattinson, stretching himself out of his Twilight persona, resulting in the most absurd moustache in contemporary cinema). Dali is just beginning as a cubist painter, and although he is a bit out of step with the Madrid underground -- he sports a ruffled shirt and pageboy haircut -- he is already announcing himself as a genius who will save Spanish art.

Dali would go on to paint such famous images as clocks that folded over tree branches, a trope with which I had some sympathy by the end of Little Ashes, but at this stage he is a man still uncertain of himself. However, it isn't long before he and Lorca are making eyes at one another. Since Dali was just starting in cubism, the eyes are on both sides of their faces.

The movie is a curious amalgam of a not-quite-there gay love story and once-over-lightly tribute to the artists, although the art itself takes second place to the bravery of the politics, especially in the case of Lorca. All the principals speak English with Spanish accents, but Lorca's poems are read in Spanish and translated in voice-over, and represent most of the movie's acknowledgment of the art being created. Another one comes in the black-and-white flashback sequences -- newsreel footage combined with scenes of people laughing and drinking champagne in Paris while can-can dancers kick up their heels behind them -- where we see bits of the 1929 Bunuel-Dali film Un Chien Andalou, with its famous shot of an eyeball being sliced by a razor blade. It's something of a tribute to Bunuel and Dali that this is still unwatchable 80 years later.

Director Paul Morrison (Wondrous Oblivion) fills the screen with many lovely images of Spain and beautifully lit scenes of jazz clubs and cafes. Some scenes -- Dali and Lorca at a window after they have gone swimming and shared a kiss, for instance -- are positively painterly. However, he is not as successful in drawing out persuasive performances: Beltran does best as a soulful Lorca, but Pattinson seems swamped by Dali's oversized personality and McNulty isn't around enough to make much of an impression beyond being feisty. Little Ashes seems neither real nor surreal, which doesn't leave much.

canada.com
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://www.rpattzrobertpattinson.com
ptiteaurel
Administratrice
Administratrice
avatar

Nombre de messages : 38566
Date d'inscription : 13/03/2009
Age : 37
Localisation : Arras

MessageSujet: Re: [Little Ashes] Critiques   Sam 13 Juin - 13:30

TRADUCTION

Les débuts de la sensibilité surréaliste rencontre ce qu'on avait l'habitude d'appeler l'amour dont on n'ose pas parler -- prouvant ainsi que , tout au moins pour Salvador Dali , c'était quelque chose qu'il fallait cacher – dans le film de Paul Morrison, Little Ashes, nous avons l'histoire de Federico Garcia Lorca, Dali et Luis Bunuel et de leur jeunesse débauchée.

Lorca, Dali et Bunuel ne sont peut être pas aussi connu aujourd'hui qu'ils auraient dû l'être, mais il fut un temps où ils étaient à la pointe de leurs arts , et en Espagne en 1922, ils étaient atrocement scandaleux . Lorca (le nouveau venu Javier Beltran) était déjà un poète célèbre – les canadiens le connaissent peut être mieux comme étant l'un des muses de Leonard Cohen's (son "Little Viennese Waltz" est devenue la chanson de Cohen "Take This Waltz") – et il était ami avec Bunuel (Matthew McNulty), qui rapidement deviendra un réalisateur avant gardiste qui voyagera de Mexico à Paris, et fera des films comme “Diary of a Chambermaid” et “The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie”.

Le film débute avec l'arrivée à Madrid de Dali (Robert Pattinson, s'étriquant de son personnage dans Twilight , et résultat il a la moustache la plus absurde de tout le cinéma contemporain ). Dali commence tout juste à devenir ce peintre cubiste , et bien qu'il ne soit pas adapté à la société de Madrid --il porte une chemise à froufrou et la coiffure d'un valet de pied – il s'annonce déjà comme le génie qui sauvera l'art espagnol .

Dali avait peint de nombreuses personnes célèbres mais aussi des horloges allongées sur un arbre , une trope pour laquelle j'ai de la compassion à la fin de Little Ashes, mais à ce moment là il et un homme qui doute de lui même but . Cependant , il ne faut pas attendre longtemps avant que lui et Lorca are ne se fassent de l'oeil. Puisque Dali commençait juste avec le cubisme , les yeux sont de chaque côté de leurs visages.

Le film est un curieux amalgame d'une histoire d'amour pseudo gay et d'un prétendu hommage aux artistes , bien que l'art soit au second plan au profit de la bravoure politique , en particulier pour Lorca. Tous parlent anglais avec un accent espagnol, mais les poèmes de Lorca sont lus en espagnol et traduit par le voix off , et représente la reconnaissance selon laquelle l'art est en construction la grande majeur partie de film. Un autre vient des flashback en noir et blanc -- de nouvelles images avec des images où des gens rient et boivent du champagne à Paris tandis que des danseurs se démènent sur la piste derrière eux – où nous voyons des bribes du film de Bunuel-Dali “ Un Chien Andalou” de 1929, avec sa célèbre scène où l'on voit un oeil se faire découper à la lame d'un rasoir .Parfois on rend hommage à Bunuel et à Dali et cette scène est toujours impossible à regarder 80 ans plus tard.

Le réalisateur Paul Morrison (Wondrous Oblivion) rempli l'écran avec de magnifiques images de l4espagne et de scènes magnifiques dans les clubs de jazz et les cafés. Certaines scènes -- Dali et Lorca à la fenêtre après leur bain de minuit et leur 1er baiser , par exemple --sont tout )à fait picturales . Toutefois , il ne réussit pas à montrer des performances convaincantes : Beltran fait de son mieux pour incarner Lorca, mais Pattinson semble englouti par la personnalité démesurée de Dali et McNulty n'est pas assez plausible dans ce personnage irritable . Little Ashes ne semble ni réaliste ni surréaliste , ce qui nous laisse insatisfait

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
admin
Administratrice
Administratrice


Nombre de messages : 16344
Date d'inscription : 12/03/2009

MessageSujet: Re: [Little Ashes] Critiques   Jeu 18 Juin - 11:52

Hello Dali

Exquisitely photographed and genuinely atmospheric, Brit director Paul Morrison's Little Ashes insinuates itself into the personal lives of three very real Spanish artists--poet Federico Garcia Lorca, filmmaker Luis Bunuel, and painter Salvador Dali--and then veers off into a highly speculative soap opera that does justice to no one. As penned by Philippa Goslett, the film seems slight, never achieving the weight or emotional depth that its three larger-than-life subjects (and Adam Suschitzky's lush cinematography) would seem to demand.

Set in 1922 among the university residences of Madrid, Little Ashes imagines a furtive but (barely) platonic love affair between the openly gay Garcia Lorca and the wildly flamboyant (but deeply closeted) Dali. Standing on the sidelines clicking his tongue in disapproval, Bunuel tries to protect his friends, encouraging them in their careers even as he indulges his own virulent homophobia by bashing strangers who cruise through the city parks like Dickensian wraiths. Adding fuel to an already torrid fire, the beautiful writer, Magdalena, drifts in and out of the men's lives, at last finding herself in love with Garcia Lorca, the one man she can never truly have. Of course, with the group dynamics, conflicting passions, and Franco's Nationalist Militia setting the stage for the Spanish Civil War, tragedy is inevitable. And if you're at all familiar with the lives of Garcia Lorca, Bunuel, and Dali, you'll have a pretty good idea where the film is headed long before it reaches its downbeat conclusion.

Spanish actor Javier Beltran, in the role of Garcia Lorca, delivers the film's most compelling performance, effectively conveying Garcia Lorca's idealism and yearning desire, and tempering it with an air of quiet anguish. With his soulful brown eyes and slightly bent posture, Beltran projects an aura of expectant betrayal, and dignified strength in the face of daunting odds. As Magdalena, Marina Gatell is almost as good, lustily infusing this gorgeous, talented, and unwise creature with a knowing vulnerability and generosity of spirit that serves her well. With considerably less to do, Matthew McNulty gives it his best shot with the Bunuel character but the role isn't well developed. Though violent and full of anger, the Luis Bunuel on display here never communicates the awesome talent and sheer genius that catapulted the filmmaker into the realm of cinematic legend; he feels secondary to the other characters. More problematic, however, is the casting of Twilight teen idol Robert Pattinson as the flamboyant Dali. The Dali character is key to the events unfolding in the movie and the actor portraying him needs to be both formidable and convincing in a role that often comes perilously close to caricature (as did the real Dali). Good as he may be in Twilight, Pattinson doesn't have the acting chops to carry off his role in Little Ashes. As his Dali careens wildly from borderline madness to over-the-border hamminess, Pattinson makes it clear from the very start that he's been spectacularly miscast. And there were times towards the end when I half expected him to start twirling his extravagant mustaches like Snidely Whiplash in an old episode of Dudley Do-Right. You can be sure that this bit of (mis)casting was by design, as there seems to be a certain desperate cynicism on the part of the filmmakers to shore up the Little Ashes box office by cashing in on Pattinson's post-Twilight popularity.

Despite its flaws and foibles (including Spanish accents that come and go), Little Ashes isn't an awful film. It's picturesque, never boring, and its allotted two hours pass by with relative ease. By far, the film's biggest obstacle is the script. Relying on an uneasy mixture of historical fact, speculation, and innuendo, it feels insubstantial, like nothing was really fleshed out as well as it could have been, ultimately cheating the actors as well as the viewers. Little Ashes aspires to be historically and culturally significant but it's really like the CliffsNotes version of a Masterpiece Theater episode adapted for the CW Network. It's Art Cinema Lite for those who want to feel like they've been culturally stimulated without really having to invest any thought or emotion into it.

par bruce wells pour examiner.com
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://www.rpattzrobertpattinson.com
ptiteaurel
Administratrice
Administratrice
avatar

Nombre de messages : 38566
Date d'inscription : 13/03/2009
Age : 37
Localisation : Arras

MessageSujet: Re: [Little Ashes] Critiques   Jeu 18 Juin - 19:58

TRADUCTION

Bonjour Dali

Photographié de manière exquise et dans une vraie atmosphère le réalisateur Brittanique Paul Morrison et son Little Ashes qui s'insinue dans les vies personnelles de 3 véritables artistes espagnols—le poète Federico Garcia Lorca, le réalisateur Luis Bunuel, et le peintre Salvador Dali—et se tourne ensuite sur un feuilleton à l'eau de rose hautement spéculatif qui ne rend hommage à personne Le scénario est de Philippa Goslett, le film semble mince , n'atteignant jamais le poids et la profondeur émotionnelle que ces 3 sujets semblait requérir (et la cinématographie luxuriante d' Adam Suschitzky)

Situé en 1922 au milieu de la résidence universitaire de Madrid, Little Ashes imagine une histoire d'amour platonique et furtive entre ouvertement gay Garcia Lorca , ouvertement gay et le sauvagement flamboyant (mais profondément étriqué ) Dali. Etant sur la ligne de touche , claquant la langue par désaccord , Bunuel tente de protéger ses amis les encourageant dans leur carrières même s'il se laisse aller à sa propre homophobie des plus virulentes en malmenant des inconnus qui croisent son chemin dans les parcs de la ville comme un spectre Dickensien . Ajoutant de l'huile sur le feu , la belle écrivain , Magdalena, intercède dans la vie de ces hommes, tombant finalement amoureuse de Garcia Lorca, le seul homme qu'elle ne peut avoir . Bien sûr , avec ce groupe on retrouve le dynamisme des passions conflictuelles, et la milice nationaliste de Franco qui deviennent la scène de la guerre civile espagnole, et la tragédie est inévitable . Et si vous êtes vraiment familier avec les vies de Garcia Lorca, Bunuel, et Dali, vous aurez une bonne idée de la direction prise par le film avant qu'il n'atteigne sa conclusion rythmée .

L'acteur espagnol Javier Beltran, dans le rôle Garcia Lorca, livre la performance la plus irrésistible du film , communiquant avec efficacité l'idéalisme de Garcia Lorca et son désir ardent , et tempérant cela avec un air légèrement angoissé . Avec ses yeux bruns et sa posture légèrement cambrée Beltran projette une aura de trahison attendue , et de force digne aux visages de ces étranges personnes . Quant à Magdalena, Marina Gatell est presque aussi belle distillant son talent et sa beauté qu'en dévoilant sa vulnérabilité et sa générosité d'esprit qui lui va si bien . Avec moins de chose à faire , Matthew McNulty fait de son mieux pour incarner Bunuel mais son rôle n'est pas bien développé . Bien que violent et fu de rage, le Luis Bunuel qu'on nous montre ici ne communique jamais le talent merveilleux le le génie qui l'a propulsé réalisateur dans le royaume des légendes cinématographiques ;il est secondaire par rapport aux autres personnages. Plus problématique, cependant , est le choix de l'idole des adolescents dans Twilight Robert Pattinson dans le rôle du flamboyant Dali. Le personnage de Dali est la clé des événements qui de déroule dans le film et l'acteur l'incarnant doit être à la fois formidable et convaincant dans un rôle qui le met souvent en danger en risquant de le faire tomber dans la caricature (comme l'avait fait le vrai Dali). Aussi bon qu'il soit dans Twilight, Pattinson ne semble pas avoir l'étoffe pour porter ce rôle dans Little Ashes. Alors que son Dali carène sauvagement à la frontière de la folie , Pattinson montre dès le début qu'il a été mal choisi . Et il y a des moments vers la fin où je m'attendais à le voir triturer ses moustaches extravagantes comme Snidely Whiplash dans un vieil épisode de Dudley Do-Right. Vous pouvez être sûr que ce mauvais choix n'a pas été fait par hasard ,car il semble y avoir un cynisme désespéré de la part des réalisateurs de booster le box office de Little Ashes box office en comptant sur la popularité de Pattinson après Twilight .

Malgré ses imperfections et ses failles ( parmi lesquelles des accents espagnols qui viennent et qui repartent) , Little Ashes in'est pas un mauvais film. C'est picturesque, jamais ennuyeux , et les 2 heures passent facilement . Mais ,le plus gros obstacle du film c'est le script. Comptant sur un mélange hasardeux de fait historique, de spéculation, et de sous entendus , on dirait qu'il n'a pas de substance, comme si rien n'avait jamais réellement existé , finalement arnaquant les acteurs et le public . Little Ashes aspire à être historique et culturellement significatif mais c'est comme une version CliffsNotes d'un chef d'oeuvre théâtrale adapté pour un épisode pour la chaîne CW . C'est de l' Art Cinema Lite pour ceux qui veulent être culturellement stimulé sans avoir vraiment dû s'investir dans les pensées ou l'émotion .

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
ptiteaurel
Administratrice
Administratrice
avatar

Nombre de messages : 38566
Date d'inscription : 13/03/2009
Age : 37
Localisation : Arras

MessageSujet: Re: [Little Ashes] Critiques   Jeu 18 Juin - 20:07

Citation :
car il semble y avoir un cynisme désespéré de la part des réalisateurs de booster le box office de Little Ashes box office en comptant sur la popularité de Pattinson après Twilight

encore un qui n'a rien compris!!!!!

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
ptiteaurel
Administratrice
Administratrice
avatar

Nombre de messages : 38566
Date d'inscription : 13/03/2009
Age : 37
Localisation : Arras

MessageSujet: Re: [Little Ashes] Critiques   Jeu 18 Juin - 21:53

En plus c'était chiant à traduire avec ses phrases à rallonges!!!!

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
admin
Administratrice
Administratrice


Nombre de messages : 16344
Date d'inscription : 12/03/2009

MessageSujet: Re: [Little Ashes] Critiques   Ven 19 Juin - 16:39

Rob Panned by Denver Post in “Little Ashes”

The movie, more’s the pity, is meant in all seriousness: a swoony, literal- minded period piece about the youthful days and nights of painter Salvador Dali, poet/playwright Federico Garcia Lorca and filmmaker Luis Buñuel. Dali is played by Robert Pattinson, the dreamboat fangboy of “Twilight” the movie, and the Internet has been burning up with pirated versions of this film’s racier scenes.

All right, give the kid a chance — he’s British and he’s serious about being an actor. Still, Pattinson will have to do better than this potted soap-opera about lust among Madrid’s upper- class artistic bad boys. Based on rumors of a physical affair between Dali and Lorca, “Little Ashes” (the title of an early Dali canvas) envisions the young artist arriving at college in 1922.

info spunk ransom
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://www.rpattzrobertpattinson.com
ptiteaurel
Administratrice
Administratrice
avatar

Nombre de messages : 38566
Date d'inscription : 13/03/2009
Age : 37
Localisation : Arras

MessageSujet: Re: [Little Ashes] Critiques   Ven 19 Juin - 18:17

TRADUCTION

Rob vu par le Denver Post dans “Little Ashes”

Le film , qui fait pitié , se veut très sérieux : un film historique sur la jeunesse et la vie du peintre Salvador Dali, du poète dramaturge Federico Garcia Lorca et du réalisateur Luis Buñuel. Dali est incarné par Robert Pattinson, le vampire idéal de “Twilight” , et Internet a été envahi par des versions piratés des scènes les plus cocasses du film.

Ok laissons sa chance à ce garçon, — il est britannique, c'est un acteur sérieux. Pourtant , Pattinson devra faire mieux que ce feuilleton à l'eau de rose sur le sexe à Madrid’ dans le cercle de mauvais garçons des classes sociales favorisés. Basé sur les rumeurs d'une prétendu histoire d'amour entre Dali et Lorca, “Little Ashes” (le titre d'une oeuvre de Dali ) nous propose une vision de l'arrivée du jeune artiste à l'université en 1922.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
admin
Administratrice
Administratrice


Nombre de messages : 16344
Date d'inscription : 12/03/2009

MessageSujet: Re: [Little Ashes] Critiques   Jeu 25 Fév - 10:32

Bay Area Reporter Reviews ‘Little Ashes’ (Contains Spoilers)

Fed­erico Gar­cia Lorca (1898–1936) was Spain’s most acclaimed play­wright (Blood Wed­ding, Yerma, The House of Bernardo Alba ) and poet of the 20th cen­tury. He was also openly gay and a vocal oppo­nent of Fran­cisco Franco’s Fas­cist forces dur­ing the Span­ish Civil War. Con­se­quently, he was killed by Fas­cist sol­diers. Last year, direc­tor Paul Mor­ri­son, work­ing from a screen­play by Philippa Goslett, released Lit­tle Ashes, an exquis­ite drama that focuses on Gar­cia Lorca’s rela­tion­ship with the Cata­lan sur­re­al­ist painter Sal­vador Dali. It has just been released in DVD.

The film begins in 1922, as Gar­cia Lorca (Javier Bel­tran) and Luis Bunuel (Matthew McNulty) arrive at a Madrid art school. They are soon joined by the eccen­tri­cally dressed Dali (Robert Pat­tin­son). Art – cin­ema (Bunuel), lit­er­a­ture (Gar­cia Lorca), or paint­ing (Dali) – con­sumes them. So does their friend­ship. Bunuel is intensely homo­pho­bic, per­haps because he is sub­con­sciously attracted to one or both of his com­pan­ions. One night, see­ing two gay men together, he shouts that mari­cones (“fag­gots”) should be shot.
Read the rest after the jump!



In scenes evoca­tive of the acclaimed PBS pro­duc­tion of Brideshead Revis­ited, Gar­cia Lorca and Dali fall in love. They bike along Spain’s rough sea coast, spend hours at the beach, read poetry, share embraces, finally kiss­ing. Their first attempt at sex fails when Dali angrily refuses to be anally pen­e­trated. A sec­ond attempt, at their rooms, is inter­rupted by Mag­dalena (Marina Gatel), another writer who is in love with Gar­cia Lorca. Later, in a remark­able scene, she has sex with him while he stares intently at Dali – clearly imag­in­ing him under­neath. Dali watches from a cor­ner, masturbating.

Bunuel, sus­pi­cious of Gar­cia Lorca and Dali’s rela­tion­ship, sneaks a look at the poet’s diary, con­firm­ing his fears. He walks to a nearby cruisy spot, encour­ages a man to approach him, and as the man pre­pares to fel­late him, Bunuel viciously kicks and beats him, then storms away. He leaves Madrid for Paris.

Dali fol­lows Bunuel to Paris, pro­foundly wound­ing Gar­cia Lorca. Dali and Bunuel col­lab­o­rate on a short film, the acclaimed Un Chien Andalou (An Andalu­cian Dog ) (1929), which Gar­cia Lorca feels is an attack on him.

In Spain, Gar­cia Lorca becomes a suc­cess­ful drama­tist. As the Span­ish Civil War begins (1936), he uses his fame to sup­port the Loy­al­ists against Franco’s Fas­cist forces, who were aided by Hitler and Mus­solini. He trav­els to Paris, and is wel­comed by Bunuel, now estranged from Dali. In a mad pur­suit of fame and wealth, Dali has com­pro­mised his art and youth­ful dreams. He’s mar­ried to Gala (Arly Jover), 11 years his senior, whom Bunuel says has sex with every hand­some man she can find while Dali watches. Gar­cia Lorca vis­its them at their lav­ish home. He resists Dali’s flir­ta­tion. Gala, encour­aged by her hus­band, tries to seduce him. Gar­cia Lorca, all roman­tic mem­o­ries of his com­pan­ion erased, leaves.

Bunuel urges Gar­cia Lorca to stay in Paris, warn­ing that he will be killed in Spain. Although touched by his con­cern, he says he must fight for what he believes. In Spain, he ral­lies peo­ple to oppose Franco. In a lovely scene, his male lover kisses his hands after a speech. Bunuel, hav­ing briefly returned to his home­land, expresses his admi­ra­tion for his friend and seems to have over­come his homophobia.

While vis­it­ing his fam­ily near Granada in Andalu­cia, Gar­cia Lorca and his father are seized by Fas­cist troops, beaten, sub­jected to homo­pho­bic slurs, and shot to death in a field, their bod­ies left unburied. In Paris, a vis­i­bly moved Bunuel, Mag­dalena, and other friends hear radio reports of his mur­der, and toast his mem­ory. A griev­ing Dali smears black paint over his face. The Fas­cists ban Gar­cia Lorca’s writings.

For much of the movie, Morrison’s direc­tion is lyri­cal, but it inten­si­fies to reach a heart­break­ing end. Bel­tran, with his sad brown eyes and charm­ing smile, is splen­did, cap­tur­ing Gar­cia Lorca’s gen­tle­ness, courage, and strength. Pat­tin­son is superb as Dali, never let­ting eccen­tric­ity become car­i­ca­ture. The hand­some McNulty (who resem­bles a young Alain Delon) is riv­et­ing as the com­plex, angry Bunuel. Gatel is mov­ing as Mag­dalena, accept­ing Gar­cia Lorca’s homo­sex­u­al­ity for what it is: his true nature, one he didn’t select. The beau­ti­ful orig­i­nal music is by Miguel Mera, and the evoca­tive cos­tumes by Anto­nio Belart.

Although its title comes from one of Gar­cia Lorca’s poems, the film is based on Dali’s 1969 con­ver­sa­tions about their friend­ship. The self-serving painter insisted he wasn’t gay, and claimed that two times he refused to let Gar­cia Lorca “screw” him, in part because it hurt, an admis­sion that he was at least twice open to sex with him. “Deep down I felt he was a great poet, and I owed him a tiny bit of the Divine Dali’s ass­hole.” The movie implies that Dali’s best self died when Gar­cia Lorca was killed.

Nei­ther Gar­cia Lorca nor Franco imag­ined how Spain would change fol­low­ing the latter’s 1975 death. It’s now among the world’s most socially lib­eral coun­tries. Gays and les­bians have full equal­ity – includ­ing all mar­riage rights and open mil­i­tary ser­vice. King Juan Car­los doesn’t use the hered­i­tary title, His Most Catholic Majesty, bestowed by Pope Alexan­der VI on his pre­de­ces­sors in 1469. Rather, he reigns over a coun­try that freed itself from an oppres­sive Church and now offers catholic rights to all cit­i­zens. Fed­erico Gar­cia Lorca helped make that happen.

source : ebar.com via thinking of rob
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://www.rpattzrobertpattinson.com
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: [Little Ashes] Critiques   

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
[Little Ashes] Critiques
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 3 sur 5Aller à la page : Précédent  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Suivant

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
TheRpattzRobertPattinson.blogspot.fr | The RPattz Club :: Let s talk about RPattz :: Silence... Moteur... And action... :: Filmographie :: Little Ashes-
Sauter vers: