The RPattz Club, Forum du site Therpattzrobertpattinson.blogspot.fr
 
Accueilhttp://therpattzrobertpattinson.blogspot.fr/CalendrierFAQS'enregistrerConnexion

Partagez | 
 

 La revue de presse de New York - Juin 2014

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
Sabine
Co-Webmastrice/Modote
Co-Webmastrice/Modote
avatar

Nombre de messages : 11161
Date d'inscription : 25/05/2009
Age : 31

MessageSujet: Re: La revue de presse de New York - Juin 2014   Ven 20 Juin - 22:36

Interview avec Huffingtonpost

Robert Pattinson Doesn't Know How To Play A Normal Guy

Robert Pattinson is tired.

The 28-year-old has spent the better part of the last month doing press for David Michôd's "The Rover," a slow-burn thriller that's caked in equal parts dirt, dried blood and nihilism. Pattinson has appeared on the cover of The Hollywood Reporter. He's done interviews with BuzzFeed, The Daily Beast, Indiewire, Jimmy Kimmel and, now, The Huffington Post. "It was good in theory," Pattinson said of the press gauntlet, before trailing off.

Fortunately, the performance Pattinson is promoting is one of his best yet. He plays Rey in "The Rover," a simple-minded criminal who gets left for dead by his brother in post-apocalyptic Australia and then goes on a journey of revenge with Eric (Guy Pearce), a man also wronged by Rey's sibling.

"I think lots of people want to do stuff that's relatable, and I want to do stuff that's unrelatable," Pattinson said of his career outlook in general. "I don't think I have particularly normal emotional reactions to things. So trying to play someone who is just a normal guy ... I don't really know how to do it."

HuffPost Entertainment spoke to Pattinson at the Bowery Hotel in Manhattan about "The Rover," his relationship with tabloid media and the never-ending cycle of rumors about his career.

You've worked with these incredible directors: David Michôd, Werner Herzog, David Cronenberg and, soon, Olivier Assayas. What are you gleaning from those experiences?
It's just going to school. I think that's exactly what I'm doing. I think a lot of actors know what they have in them, and they kind of work with directors who help them do the specific thing that they already want. I have no idea what I have! I'm just kind of hoping something will happen if I work with Herzog or Cronenberg.

A lot of coverage surrounding your performance in "The Rover" is couched in headlines about how this film puts "Twilight" behind you. But "Twilight" was two years ago, and it felt like "Cosmopolis" already "put 'Twilight' behind you." Does that narrative get annoying?
I guess when certain people ask me, it's kind of annoying. Like, "How do you feel about everyone seeing stuff differently?" It's kind of insulting. "So you're saying all the stuff I did before was shit? Thanks, man!" I always forget how little people actually know you. You feel like you've done so many interviews, but most people have just seen a couple movies. Maybe! Or just seen you in a tabloid or something. You kind of forget that when you're in the center of it.

So much was made about you singing "Pretty Girl Rock" after the Cannes premiere that I expected it to be a much bigger moment. But it's kind of subdued and melancholy. Did the response that scene received surprise you at all?
The one thing I was thinking was that there was some kind of meta, breaking-the-fourth-wall thing happening, because of all the "Twilight" stuff. But it's really not that, and that's the one thing I was afraid of it being. Obviously people started bringing it up thinking it's a comment on something.

I guess? I don’t know why they would think that.
Because people love all that stuff. I always read film reviews, and so many always love it when the movie is winking at itself and it's being self aware. Who wants that? It's crazy! So I didn't want it to seem like it was self aware. I like it, though. When the song cuts in, that's the funniest part. It's so loud. He's skipping behind Guy afterward. Do you know those guys who recut "The Shining" trailer? It's like suddenly the movie becomes that moment.

Do you actually read reviews?
Yeah. I don't quite know why. It's so difficult to figure out if you're doing the right thing. I guess there's some way of knowing after reading, sort of. But sometimes it's just incredible how opposite everything can be. It's bizarre. You learn absolutely nothing after, and you just hate bad reviews. You can't even remember the good ones.

On the topic of reading things about yourself: There was a story recently that claimed you were being sought for Indiana Jones. How do you find out about ridiculous casting rumors like that? Google alerts?
On the press tour. I had no idea. I swear it's people who know it's going to generate tons of bad publicity for me. There will be one totally random article not based on anything, and then there are 50 afterwards totally slamming me. It's like, "I didn't even say anything!"

You've been in the public eye for a while now, but does it still surprise you how much false information is published about you?
It's really crazy. With me as well, it's the same stories again and again and again. No matter what. I was trying to figure out a way to not be in tabloids anymore, and I just don't even know how to do it. I thought if you don't get photographed then they can't do anything.

No, it doesn't matter.
No, they put, like, five-year-old photographs in articles.

You seem to have very eclectic tastes. Do you ever worry about playing a movie-star game, where you do one for them and one for you?
I'm not entirely sure how it works. I've seen other actors who try to do that, or just done studio movie after studio movie, and then suddenly it just ends. So, I don't really know what the game is. I just kind of think if there's at least one element that you can guarantee is going to bring some kind of fulfillment to your life -- which is in a lot of ways working with someone who is just kind of a hero -- than even if the movie is terrible, you know something [positive] will happen just to say you did it.

Source

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Sabine
Co-Webmastrice/Modote
Co-Webmastrice/Modote
avatar

Nombre de messages : 11161
Date d'inscription : 25/05/2009
Age : 31

MessageSujet: Re: La revue de presse de New York - Juin 2014   Sam 21 Juin - 10:39

Traduction HuffPost

Robert Pattinson ne sait pas jouer un mec normal

Robert Pattinson est fatigué.

L'acteur de 28 ans a passé une grande partie du mois dernier à faire la promotion de 'The Rover' de David Michod, un thriller lent qui est à égalité niveau saleté, sang séché et nihilisme. Pattinson est apparu sur la couverture de The Hollywood Reporter. Il a fait des interviews avec BuzzFeed, The Daily Beast, Indiewire, Jimmy Kimmel et maintenant, The Huffington Post. "C'était une bonne théorie" dit Pattinson à propos de la critique de la presse, avant d'enchaîner.

Heureusement, la performance de Pattinson promeut sa meilleure interprétation jusqu'à présent. Il joue Rey dans "The Rover", un criminel simple d'esprit qui est laissé pour mort par son frère dans une Australie post-apocalyptique et ensuite il se lance dans un voyage vengeur avec Eric (Guy Pearce), un homme aussi lésé par le frère de Rey.

"Je pense que beaucoup de gens veulent faire des choses auxquelles on peut s'identifier, pour moi c'est le contraire," explique Pattinson au sujet de ses perspectives de carrières en général. Je ne pense pas avoir des réactions émotionnelles normales. Donc de jouer quelqu'un qui est simplement un mec normal... Je ne sais pas vraiment comment le faire."

HuffPost Entertainment a discuté avec Pattinson au Bowery Hotel à Manhattan à propos de "The Rover", sa relation avec les tabloïds et le cycle sans fin des rumeurs sur sa carrière.

Vous avez travailler avec ces réalisateurs incroyable : David Michod, Werner Herzog, David Cronenberg et bientôt, Olivier Assayas. Que glanez-vous de ces expériences ?

C'est comme aller à l'école. Je pense que c'est exactement ce que je fais. Je pense que beaucoup d'acteurs savent ce qu'ils ont en eux et ils travaillent avec des réalisateurs qui les aident à faire la chose spécifique qu'ils ont déjà. Je n'ai aucune idée de ce que j'ai ! J'espère juste que quelque chose va arriver si je travaille avec Herzog ou Cronenberg.

Un grand nombre nombre de reportage autour de votre performance dans "The Rover" ont comme phrases d'accroches la manière dont ce film à mis Twilight derrière vous. Mais Twilight date d'il y a deux ans et j'ai l'impression que Cosmopolis a déjà mis Twilight derrière vous. Est-ce que cela vous dérange ?

Je suppose que quand certaines personnes me le demande, c'est un peu agaçant. C'est comme si on me disait, "Que ressentez-vous sur le fait que tout le monde voit les choses différemment ?"C'est assez insultant. "Donc vous dites que tout ce que j'ai fait avant c'était de la merde ? Merci mec !" J'oublie toujours à quel point les gens me connaissent peu en fait. Vous avez l'impression d'avoir fait beaucoup d'interviews, mais la plupart des gens ont juste vu quelques films. Peut-être ! Ou vous on juste vu dans un tabloïd. Vous avez tendance à oublier ça quand vous êtes au centre de l'attention.

On en a tellement fait sur le fait que vous chantiez "Pretty Girl Rock" après la première à Cannes que je m'attendais à un plus grand moment. Mais c'est assez morose et mélancolique. Est-ce que la réaction qu'a suscité cette scène vous a surpris ?

La seule chose à laquelle je pensais c'était qu'il y avait un espèce de truc "il faut briser sa carapace" à cause de tout le truc Twilight. Mais ce n'est pas vraiment ça et c'est la chose qui me faisait peur. Évidemment les gens ont commencé à penser que c'était un commentaire sur quelque chose.

Je suppose ? Je ne sais pas pourquoi ils penserait ça.

Parce que les gens adorent ce genre de choses. Je lis toujours les bonnes critiques de films et un grand nombre adore toujours quand le film est un clin d’œil à lui même et qu'il en a bien conscience. Qui veut ça ? C'est dingue ! Donc je ne veux pas que ça ait l'air conscient. Bien que je l'aime bien. Quand la chanson est jouée, c'est la partie la plus drôle. C'est tellement fort. Il saute derrière Guy après ça. Connaissez vous les gars qui ont refait la bande annonce de The Shining" ? C'est comme si soudainement le film devient ce moment.

Lisez vous les critiques ?

Ouais. Je ne sais pas vraiment pourquoi. C'est si difficile de déterminer si vous faites la bonne chose. Je suppose qu'il y a un moyen de savoir après avoir lu, en quelque sorte. Mais parfois c'est juste incroyable à quel point les choses peuvent être opposées. Vous n'apprenez rien du tout après et vous détestez les mauvaises critiques. Vous ne vous rappelez même pas des bonnes.

Sur le même sujet. Il y a une histoire récemment qui clame que vos avez été approché pour Indiana Jones. Comment êtes vous au courant des rumeurs de casting ridicules comme celle là ? Les alertes Google ?
Lors de la promotion avec la presse. Je n'en avais aucune idée. Je jure que ce sont des gens qui savent qu'ils vont générer des tonnes de mauvaises publicités pour moi. Il va y avoir un article banal, basé sur rien, et ensuite il y en a 50 qui me mettent une claque. Je me dis "Je n'ai même pas encore dit quelque chose !"

Vous êtes sous l’œil du public depuis un moment maintenant, mais est-ce que ça vous surprend toujours toutes ces fausses informations qui sont publiées sur vous ?
C'est vraiment dingue. Avec moi aussi, c'est la même histoire, encore et encore et encore. Peu importe quoi. J'essayais de trouver un moyen de ne plus être dans les tabloïds, et je ne sais même pas comment faire ça. Je pensais que si vous n'étiez pas photographiés et bien, ils ne peuvent rien faire.

Non ce n'est pas grave.
Non, ils ajoutent des photos vieilles de 5 ans à leur article.

Vous semblez avoir des goûts très éclectiques.  Ça ne vous inquiète jamais de devoir jouer le jeu de la star de cinéma alors que  vous en faites un pour eux et un autre pour vous?

Je ne sais pas vraiment comment ça marche. J'ai vu d'autres acteurs essayer de le faire, ou simplement enchaîner les films de studio et soudainement ça se termine. Donc, je ne sais pas vraiment quel est le jeu. Je pense que le seul élément que vous pouvez garantir c'est que ça vous apporte une sorte d'accomplissement dans votre vie - c'est de bien des manières comme travailler avec quelqu'un qui est une sorte d’héro - même si le film est terrible, vous savez que quelque chose de positif va se passer juste en disant que vous l'avez fait.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Alice
Rob'sédé
Rob'sédé
avatar

Nombre de messages : 12206
Date d'inscription : 30/03/2010
Age : 69
Localisation : Un petit coin au soleil

MessageSujet: La revue de presse de New York - Juin 2014   Sam 21 Juin - 11:30

 

_________________

" La frénésie que je suscite aujourd'hui ne me fera jamais oublier les horreurs que j'ai pu lire a mon sujet " Robert Pattinson"
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
lilipucia
Co-Webmastrice/Modote
Co-Webmastrice/Modote
avatar

Nombre de messages : 14223
Date d'inscription : 17/11/2009
Age : 44
Localisation : suisse

MessageSujet: Re: La revue de presse de New York - Juin 2014   Sam 21 Juin - 16:17

 

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Patty
Rob'sédé
Rob'sédé
avatar

Nombre de messages : 10897
Date d'inscription : 18/01/2010
Age : 58
Localisation : nancy

MessageSujet: Re: La revue de presse de New York - Juin 2014   Sam 21 Juin - 17:20

 

_________________
banniere 2015
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
ptiteaurel
Administratrice
Administratrice
avatar

Nombre de messages : 38566
Date d'inscription : 13/03/2009
Age : 37
Localisation : Arras

MessageSujet: Re: La revue de presse de New York - Juin 2014   Sam 21 Juin - 18:47

je lirais un jour lol!

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Sabine
Co-Webmastrice/Modote
Co-Webmastrice/Modote
avatar

Nombre de messages : 11161
Date d'inscription : 25/05/2009
Age : 31

MessageSujet: Re: La revue de presse de New York - Juin 2014   Sam 21 Juin - 19:26

ptiteaurel a écrit:
je lirais un jour lol!

Comme un jour je prendrais le temps de regarder toutes les vidéos interviews  lol! lol! 

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
jak
Rob'sédé
Rob'sédé
avatar

Nombre de messages : 2627
Date d'inscription : 25/04/2012
Age : 74

MessageSujet: Re: La revue de presse de New York - Juin 2014   Dim 22 Juin - 0:49

 
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Rnath
Rob'sédé
Rob'sédé
avatar

Nombre de messages : 1528
Date d'inscription : 21/01/2013
Age : 45
Localisation : Dijon

MessageSujet: Re: La revue de presse de New York - Juin 2014   Dim 22 Juin - 13:04

 elle est bizarre cette interview    avec des questions à double-sens, limite blessantes.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
fumée
Rob'sédé
Rob'sédé
avatar

Nombre de messages : 2890
Date d'inscription : 26/05/2013
Age : 62
Localisation : Périgueux

MessageSujet: Re: La revue de presse de New York - Juin 2014   Dim 22 Juin - 17:49

 
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Jel
Rob'sédé
Rob'sédé
avatar

Nombre de messages : 6638
Date d'inscription : 11/02/2011
Age : 28

MessageSujet: Re: La revue de presse de New York - Juin 2014   Lun 23 Juin - 1:10

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Sabine
Co-Webmastrice/Modote
Co-Webmastrice/Modote
avatar

Nombre de messages : 11161
Date d'inscription : 25/05/2009
Age : 31

MessageSujet: Re: La revue de presse de New York - Juin 2014   Jeu 26 Juin - 10:26

Interview avec Salon

Robert Pattinson: “I feel extremely uncomfortable playing English people”

The teen icon and newly serious actor on fame, film and why he hates doing British accents in movies

He’s been trying to shed Edward Cullen for years — and now he may finally have done it.

Robert Pattinson rose to megafame playing Cullen, a lovelorn vampire, in the “Twilight” series, but has in his off-dury hours been trying to become something more interesting than a leading man. After the period piece “Bel Ami” and the romantic dramas “Remember Me” and “Water for Elephants” didn’t connect, Pattinson has styled himself as a versatile supporting actor. In David Cronenberg’s “Cosmopolis,” Pattinson, perpetually picking up new visitors in his limousine, was nominally the lead but was willing to cede the role of most interesting person on-screen to just about anyone who crossed his path; in Cronenberg’s forthcoming “Maps to the Stars,” Pattinson plays the limo driver.

And in David Michôd’s new film “The Rover,” Pattinson makes his greatest departure yet, playing a mentally challenged vagrant who’s migrated to a post-apocalyptic Australia and finds himself on a quest to help Guy Pearce find his car. It’s the sort of role that at a different time of year, and in a tonier, more tasteful sort of film, ends up in Oscar conversations: Pattinson has mottled brown teeth and a thick Southern accent. If this sounds like a way for Pattinson to finally shed the constraints of his leading-man roles, it is — but it’s clear that Pattinson is having fun while doing it.

He seemed open and relaxed in his standard white T-shirt when we met at New York’s Bowery Hotel, where he chugged sparkling water between answers. He spoke freely about what’s next up — including James Gray’s “Lost City of Z” adaptation and “Life,” a James Dean biopic by Anton Corbijn. Spoiler alert: Pattinson is not playing Dean.

When you go for weeks at a time promoting something, are there questions you’re repeatedly asked that you’re tired of answering?

Well, I can never remember what I’m asked. But I kept getting asked about flies in the outback, because I’d mentioned one time in the very first interview I did, “Oh, there’s loads of flies there — it’s really crazy.” And when interviewers will ask you again, I’m like, “Surely, surely you’ve seen this. Yes, there are a lot of flies.” And they just keep asking. What do I say? “Oh, actually flies are amazing; it was the best part of all of it.”

I feel like there’s only so much you can say about flies.

Which is absolutely nothing.

So you started filming last year – take me through a little bit of your state of mind. You must have been feeling pretty free in some sense, now that the “Twilight” franchise is completely over.

I got the part about eight or nine months before we started shooting it. And then I was supposed to shoot another movie before I ended up doing it. And I did “Maps to the Stars” as well, just a little part. I was going to do another lead role and then it got pushed, so I’ve basically been thinking about this for so long that it kind of feels like I was almost working the whole time.

But yeah, I finished “Twilight” like, six or seven months before maybe. It’s strange, I mean, it’s kind of — it feels like it was such a long time ago because we finished shooting ages ago, like two or three years ago. But yeah, it is interesting – you’re kind of like, “Oh, this is actually what you’re branching out doing now, this is what your career is and it’s actually kind of looking like something.” Whereas when I did each of the movies in between the “Twilight” movies it kind of reset every time. Every “Twilight” was so huge that it just overshadowed everything.

In this film you’re, to a degree, supporting Guy Pearce, and your role in “Maps to the Stars” is small, too. Are you backing away from leading-man roles?

Yeah. Well, for this I just really loved the part but a lot of the movies I’ve done that haven’t really come out yet — actually, no, I guess I’m playing the lead in the Corbijn movie. But even if it’s a lead, it’s not like the flashy role. I mean, in the movie I’m doing with Corbijn, it has James Dean in it and I’m the guy who’s photographing him. But it’s not like a part where I’m hiding away, but you’re sharing the burden a lot of the time. Stuff that appeals to me as a lead is so specific, and I kind of want to work with these directors just to go to the school, and so if I’m doing 10 days in a Werner Herzog movie, I can basically do any part.

I think there was a perception out there with “Cosmopolis,” in particular, that you were kind of consciously choosing to really take a part that was radically different from your persona. Does that enter your mind when you’re choosing parts?

No, because it’s not like – no, not really at all. I did this movie called “Bel Ami” — I mean, I was really young when I decided to do it as well. But I was thinking of it as kind of meta – there was a subtext to it. Where you have basically an entirely female audience from “Twilight,” and you play a part of a guy who’s basically like cheating women out of money, like, exclusively cheating them. And I thought that was kind of funny. I don’t think anyone really noticed the meta context of it.

Do you pay attention to how things are received?

Yeah, I understand. I don’t really know why. Because you do end up just thinking like, it doesn’t really matter. I’ve never had the experience where I’ve really hated a movie and it suddenly got great reviews. Maybe that would change my mind. But if you like something, the reviews mean nothing. The only person it really matters to is the filmmaker.

For some reason I feel kind of responsible if something is … even if it’s not singling out me, if something gets a bad review then I feel bad because I haven’t really had a bad experience on a movie. So I want to do my best to elevate them.

To a certain degree — probably less so now — you’re so closely identified with “Twilight.” Does that make it more of a leap of faith for a director to cast you because of preconceptions people have?

It kind of remains to be seen. I know that there’s definitely some kind of baggage, but I guess if it brings people into the cinema, which I’m not entirely sure if it does, then — but I don’t know. I think you end up fighting for all the parts you want anyway. I guess as I’m going further and further away from “Twilight,” the perception slowly becomes something else. Because I haven’t really tried to hit the same market again. Maybe because I don’t really know how to.

When you look at directors you want to work with, is there a list?

It’s kind of a list. I’m basically trying to go to acting school and film school by working with the best possible teachers, and also people who I grew up watching their movies. There are a few people who I really, specifically want to work with because of the performances they get out of their actors. I kind of feel like there’s something in me which is in that kind of ballpark. Like James Gray — I just loved all the stuff he did with Joaquin. And also just talking to James for years, I like his ideas about performance. And people like [“Rust and Bone” director] Jacques Audiard and stuff. But then there are other people like Herzog and Cronenberg; I never even thought I would be in any realm of possibility of getting a part with them. And then you’re suddenly doing it, it’s almost ridiculous. I’ll kind of do any part in any of their movies and just try and figure it out.

The moment in “The Rover” when you’re sitting in the truck and you’re calmly singing a Keri Hilson song ["Pretty Girl Rock"] just before a really violent moment — how did you get in the mind-set for that scene in particular? How long did it take to put that together?

I thought that was just going to be like a little inset shot because it was just briefly mentioned he’s singing along to the radio. And it’s this minute and half long shot, it’s absolutely crazy. A lot of what I was trying to do with the character the whole time is just playing someone who — it’s like someone with crazy ADD is just stuck between two decisions, constantly. Do you know on old TVs when you press down on two channels at the same time and you’re kind of in between? It’s his biggest and most pensive, deep moment. And really at the same time, he’s kind of not really thinking anything. He’s thinking everything and nothing at the same time. He’s almost empty.

How do you get to that place as an actor?

I kind of realized that how I was approaching parts in a kind of cerebral way and trying to analyze stuff is probably not the best way to do it. If you approach it more like music, which — “Cosmopolis” is the first time I’d done something in a very highly stylized dialect and then just started to listen to the rhythm and the cadence of it. It suddenly freed up something. You’re not really thinking and it’s just performing.

And you can approach almost any part just to kind of make it feel nice, like to perform it and then you’re suddenly like, Oh, this is way easier than trying to preempt every possible perception from the audience, from the other actor, and blah, blah, blah. And you can actually have fun doing it.

You’ve now several times played an American. What, if anything, is different there?

I don’t know, I’ve never really thought of it as actually specifically playing an American. I guess there are little elements of it, like — no, you kind of approach it the same way. I mean, I feel extremely uncomfortable playing English people, though. Even if I’m doing an English accent, I don’t even know how to do my normal accent, it just suddenly goes into this weird acting voice. And so I get incredibly self-conscious about it! So when I’m doing an American, it feels more like you’re in a movie.

I gathered that your character in “The Rover” was mean to be from the Southern U.S.

Yeah, the sort of migrant, seasonal laborer. It’s just like all the Chinese people moving to Africa now, it’s kind of the same thing. The Western economy has collapsed so you sort of just go anywhere where there’s any work.

Did you, the director and Guy know more than we, the audience, explicitly know about how the civilization collapsed and everything? Did you work that out together?

I think David and Guy do. Because I was there for three weeks before we started shooting, and I kept trying to push David on it and he was so unwilling to tell me anything. And I guess it makes sense for my character to not know anything; he just followed his brother there.

But I think one of the things that I liked about it so much is that the script — there were two scenes, the dialogue-heavy scenes with me and Guy. There was so much detail in them but it’s detail that doesn’t really pertain to anything else in the story. And then placed in the context of almost no dialogue whatsoever. I liked when it was completely uncompromising to the audience, it’s like, “No, this is a fully realized character and you can either run with it or not.”

It’s putting a lot of trust in the audience, in a way.

And I don’t think a lot of people do that. I think with this, and with “Cosmopolis” as well, it’s one of those — I like movies where you leave and you’re not supposed to know how you feel afterward, ever.

source

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Sabine
Co-Webmastrice/Modote
Co-Webmastrice/Modote
avatar

Nombre de messages : 11161
Date d'inscription : 25/05/2009
Age : 31

MessageSujet: Re: La revue de presse de New York - Juin 2014   Jeu 26 Juin - 14:24

La traduction de l'interview avec Salon

Robert Pattinson : Jouer un anglais me met très mal à l'aise"

L’icône des adolescents et le nouvellement sérieux acteur parle de la célébrité, du cinéma et pourquoi il déteste faire des accents anglais dans les films.

Il a essayé de se débarrasser d'Edward Cullen depuis des années - et maintenant il a peut-être enfin réussi à le faire.

Robert Pattinson est passé d'une méga star en jouant Cullen, le vampire se languissant d'amour, dans la saga "Twilight", mais durant ses heures perdues il a essayé de devenir quelqu'un de plus intéressant qu'une vedette. Après que le film d'époque "Bel Ami" et les drames romantiques "Remember Me" et "Water For Elephants" n'aient pas marché, Pattinson s'est transformé en second rôle polyvalent. Dans "Cosmopolis" de David Cronenberg, Pattinson, qui avait perpétuellement de nouveaux visiteurs dans sa limousine, était la vedette mais il était prêt à céder le rôle de la personne la plus intéressante à l'écran à quiconque croisait son chemin; dans le prochain Cronenberg "Maps To The Stars", Pattinson joue un chauffeur de limousine.

Et dans le nouveau film de David Michod "The Rover", Pattinson fait son meilleur départ jusqu'à présent, en jouant un vagabond, déficient intellectuel, qui a migré vers une Australie post-apocalyptique et qui se retrouve dans une quête pour aider Guy Pearce à retrouver sa voiture. C'est le genre de rôle qui à un autre moment de l'année et dans un film qui a plus de saveur, fini dans les discussions sur les Oscars : Pattinson a les dents tâchées et un fort accent du sud. Si cela sonne comme un moyen pour Pattinson de finalement se débarrasser des contraintes des premiers rôles, ça l'est - mais il est clair que Pattinson à pris du plaisir à le faire.

Il semblait ouvert et détendu dans son T-shirt blanc classique quand nous l'avons rencontré au Bowery Hotel à New York, où il sirotait de l'eau gazeuse entre les réponses. Il parlait librement de ce qui l'attend ensuite - incluant l'adaptation de "Lost City of Z" de James Gray's et "Life", un biopic sur James Dean par Anton Corbijn. Alerte Spoiler : Pattinson ne joue pas Dean .

Quand cela fait des semaines que vous faites la promotion de quelque chose, y a-t-il des questions que l'on vous pose sans cesse et auxquelles vous êtes fatigués de répondre ?

Eh bien, je ne me souviens jamais de ce qu'on me demande. Mais on a pas arrêté de m'interroger sur les mouches dans l'outback, car je l'ai mentionné une fois dans la toute première interview que j'ai faite, "Oh il y avait plein de mouches là-bas - c'était vraiment dingue." Et quand les journalistes me réinterrogent dessus, je me dis, "Bien sûr, bien sûr, vous avez vu ça. Oui, il y avait pleins de mouches." Et ils continuent de vous questionner. Que puis-je dire ? "Oh, en fait, les mouches sont géniales; c'était la meilleure partie du tournage."

J'ai l'impression que vous pouvez en dire tellement sur les mouches

Ce qui n'est rien.

Vous avez donc commencé le tournage l'an dernier - dites m'en un peu plus sur votre état d'esprit. Vous devez vous sentir plus libre dans un certains sens, maintenant que la saga "Twilight" est complétement terminée.

J'ai eu le rôle 8 à 9 mois avant le début du tournage. Et ensuite, j'étais supposé tourner un autre film avant de l'avoir fini. Et j'ai fais "Maps To The Stars" aussi, juste un petit rôle. J'allais faire un autre rôle principal et puis ça a été repoussé, donc j'y pensais depuis tellement longtemps que j'ai eu l'impression d'avoir presque tout le temps travaillé.

Mais oui, j'ai fini "Twilight", 6 ou 7 mois avant peut-être. C'est étrange, je veux dire, j'ai l'impression que c'était il y a très longtemps car cela fait un moment que nous avons terminé le tournage, il y a 2 ou 3 ans. Mais ouais, c'est intéressant - vous vous dites, " Oh, vous vous élargissez maintenant, c'est ce qu'est votre carrière et en fait ça ressemble à quelque chose." Alors que quand je faisais chaque films entre les films "Twilight" je repartais de zéro à chaque fois. Chaque "Twilight" était tellement énorme que ça éclipsait tout le reste.

Dans ce film, à un certain degré, vous soutenez Guy Pearce et votre rôle dans "Maps To The Stars" est petit aussi. Est-ce que vous vous éloignez des rôles principaux ?

Ouais. Eh bien, pour celui-ci j'ai juste adoré le rôle, mais dans la plupart des films que j'ai fait, ça n'a pas vraiment transparu encore - en fait, non, je suppose que je joue le rôle principal dans le film de Corbijn. Mais même si c'est le rôle principal, ce n'est pas un rôle tape-à-l'oeil. Je veux dire, dans le film que j'ai fait avec Crorbijn, il y a James Dean dedans et je suis le gars qui le photographie. Mais ce n'est pas un rôle dans lequel je me cache, mais vous partagez la charge la plupart du temps. Les choses qui m'attirent dans les rôles principaux sont tellement spécifiques et je veux travailler avec ces réalisateurs , juste pour apprendre et donc si je travaille 10 jours dans un film de Werner Herzog, je peux pratiquement faire n'importe quel rôle.

Je pense que les gens ont changé de regard avec "Cosmopolis" en particulier, vous avez choisi consciemment de prendre un rôle qui est radicalement différent de votre image. Est-ce que vous pensez à cela quand vous choisissez un rôle ?

Non, car ce n'est pas comme si - non pas du tout. J'ai fait un film qui s'appelle "Bel Ami" - Je veux dire, j'étais très jeune quand j'ai décidé de le faire aussi. Mais je me disais que c'était en quelque sorte profond - il y avait un sujet sous-jacent. Lorsque vous avez un public entièrement féminin grâce "Twilight" et que vous jouez le rôle d'un gars qui, en fait, trompe les femmes pour de l'argent et qui ne fait que ça. Je me suis dis que ce serait assez drôle. Je ne pense pas que quiconque ait remarqué le sens profond derrière ça.

Êtes-vous attentif à la manière dont les choses sont perçues ?

Oui, je comprends. Je ne sais pas vraiment comment. Car vous finissez par pensez que ça n'a pas vraiment d'importance. Je n'ai pas eu d'expérience ou j'ai vraiment détesté un film et où soudainement il a eu d'excellentes critiques. Peut-être que ça changerait ma vision des choses. Mais si vous aimez quelque chose, les critiques ne veulent rien dire. La seule personne qui compte vraiment c'est le réalisateur.

Pour une quelconque raison j'ai le sentiment d'être responsable si quelque chose... même si ça ne m'est pas spécifique, si quelque chose à une mauvaise critique, alors je me sens mal car je n'ai pas vraiment eu de mauvaises expériences sur un film. Donc je veux faire de mon mieux pour les élever.

Dans une certaine mesure - probablement moins aujourd'hui - vous êtes étroitement identifié à "Twilight". Est-ce que quand un réalisateur vous choisi cela fait office d'acte de foi, à cause de idées reçues qu'ont les gens ?

Ça reste encore à voir. Je sais que j'ai incontestablement des bagages, mais je suppose que si ça permet au gens d'aller au cinéma, ce dont je ne suis pas totalement sûr, eh bien - je ne sais pas. Je pense que vous finissez par vous battre pour tous les rôles que vous voulez de toute façon. Je suppose que plus je m'éloigne de "Twilight", plus la perception devient doucement différente. Car je n'ai pas vraiment essayé de jouer sur le même marché encore. Peut-être parce que je ne sais pas vraiment comment le faire.

Quand vous regardez les réalisateurs avec qui vous voulez travailler, y a t-il une liste ?

c'est une sorte de liste. En fait, j'essaye de suivre des cours de comédie et d'aller à l'école du cinéma en travaillant avec les meilleurs professeurs possible, mais aussi avec des gens dont j'ai grandi en regardant leurs films. Il y a quelques personnes avec qui je veux vraiment travailler à cause des performances qu'ils obtiennent de leurs acteurs. J'ai le sentiment qu'il y a quelque chose en moi qui en est à ce stade. Comme avec James Gray - j'ai adoré toutes les choses qu'il a faite avec Joaquin. Et aussi en parlant avec James depuis des années, j'aime ses idées sur l'interprétation. Et des gens comme Jacques Audiard [le réalisateur de "De rouille et d'os"]. Mais il y a d'autres personnes comme Herzog et Cronenberg; je n'ai jamais pensé que ce serait du domaine du possible que je puisse avoir un rôle avec eux. Et puis, tout à coup vous le faites, c'est presque ridicule. Je ferais à peu près n'importe quel rôle dans leur film et j'essaye juste de comprendre.

Ce moment dans "The Rover" où vous êtes assis dans la voiture et vous chantez tranquillement une chanson de Keri Hilson [Pretty Girl Rock] juste avant un moment vraiment violent - Dans quel état d'esprit étiez-vous pour cette scène en particulier ? Combien de temps ça a pris pour le faire ?

Je pensais que ce serait comme une petite parenthèse car c'était brièvement mentionné qu'il chantait en même temps que la radio. Et c'est cette prise d'une minute et demie, c'est absolument dingue. Ce que j'essayais surtout de faire avec le personnage durant tout ce temps, c'était simplement de jouer quelqu'un qui - c'est comme une personne avec des troubles du comportements dingues, qui est coincé entre deux décisions, constamment. C'est comme sur les vieilles télés vous savez, quand vous appuyez sur deux chaînes en même temps et que vous êtes bloqués entre les deux ? C'est son moment le plus pensif, profond. Et en même temps, il ne pense pas vraiment à grand chose. Il pense à tout et rien à la fois. Il est presque vide.

Comment atteignez vous ce moment en tant qu'acteur ?

J'ai en quelque sorte réalisé que la manière dont j'approchais les rôles, d'une façon cérébrale et que j'essayais d'analyser les choses, n'est probablement pas la meilleure façon de faire. Si vous l'approchez plus comme la musique, comme dans "Cosmopols" où c'était la première fois que je faisais quelque chose avec un dialecte très très stylisé , j'ai commencé à écouter la cadence et le rythme des dialogues. Ça a soudainement libéré quelque chose. Vous ne pensez pas vraiment, vous êtes juste dans l'interprétation.

Et vous pouvez aborder pratiquement n'importe quel rôle, juste en les rendant agréable à interpréter et ensuite, tout à coup vous vous dites, "Oh c'est bien plus simple que d'essayer d'anticiper toutes les perceptions possibles du public, de l'autre acteur et bla, bla, bla. Et vous pouvez prendre du plaisir en le faisant.

cela fait maintenant plusieurs fois que vous jouez un américain. Qu'est ce qui est différent ?

Je ne sais pas , je n'y pense pas comme si je jouais spécifiquement un américain. Je suppose qu'il y a des petits éléments, comme - non, vous l'approchez de la même manière. Je veux dire, jouer une personne anglaise me met extrêmement mal à l'aise. Même si je fais un accent anglais, je ne sais même pas comment faire mon accent habituel, ça se transforme rapidement en cette voix d'acteur bizarre. Et j'en suis très conscient ! Donc quand je joue un américain, j'ai plus l'impression d'être dans un film.

J'ai compris que votre personnage dans "The Rover" venait des États-Unis du sud.

Ouais, c'est une sorte de migrant, de travailleur saisonnier. C'est comme tous ces chinois que vont en Afrique en ce moment, c'est un peu la même chose. L'économie de l'ouest s'est effondrée donc vous allez n'importe où il y a du travail.

Est-ce qu'avec le réalisateur et Guy vous en savez plus que le public sur la manière dont la civilisation s'est effondrée ? Avez-vous travaillé cela ensemble ?

Je pense que David et Guy l'ont fait. Car j'étais là-bas trois semaines avant que nous ne commencions le tournage et j'essayais sans cesse de pousser David sur ce sujet et il était peu disposé à me dire quoique ce soit. Et je suppose que ça fait sens avec mon personnage, de ne rien savoir; il a juste suivi son frère la-bas.

Mais je pense qu'une des choses que j'ai tellement apprécié dans ce film et que dans le scénario - il y avait deux scènes de dialogues dense entre Guy et moi. Il y avait tellement de détails sur eux, mais ce sont des détails qui ne se rapportent à rien d'autre dans l'histoire. Et ensuite placé dans le contexte d'un dialogue quasi inexistant. J'ai aimé qu'il n'y ait pas de compromis pour le public, vous vous dites, "Non, c'est un personne complètement abouti et vous pouvez aller avec ou pas".

C'est avoir une grande confiance dans le public, en quelque sorte.

Et je ne pense pas que beaucoup de personnes le fassent. Je pense qu'avec ce film, et avec "Cosmopolis" aussi, c'est un de ceux - J'aime les films où les gens partent et vous ne savez jamais comment vous sentir après le film.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
ptiteaurel
Administratrice
Administratrice
avatar

Nombre de messages : 38566
Date d'inscription : 13/03/2009
Age : 37
Localisation : Arras

MessageSujet: Re: La revue de presse de New York - Juin 2014   Jeu 26 Juin - 15:52


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Patty
Rob'sédé
Rob'sédé
avatar

Nombre de messages : 10897
Date d'inscription : 18/01/2010
Age : 58
Localisation : nancy

MessageSujet: Re: La revue de presse de New York - Juin 2014   Jeu 26 Juin - 16:38

Un grand    

_________________
banniere 2015
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
lilipucia
Co-Webmastrice/Modote
Co-Webmastrice/Modote
avatar

Nombre de messages : 14223
Date d'inscription : 17/11/2009
Age : 44
Localisation : suisse

MessageSujet: Re: La revue de presse de New York - Juin 2014   Jeu 26 Juin - 17:21

   

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
jak
Rob'sédé
Rob'sédé
avatar

Nombre de messages : 2627
Date d'inscription : 25/04/2012
Age : 74

MessageSujet: Re: La revue de presse de New York - Juin 2014   Jeu 26 Juin - 17:26

 pour cette itw intéressante et pour la longue traduction   
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
fumée
Rob'sédé
Rob'sédé
avatar

Nombre de messages : 2890
Date d'inscription : 26/05/2013
Age : 62
Localisation : Périgueux

MessageSujet: Re: La revue de presse de New York - Juin 2014   Jeu 26 Juin - 23:29

Very Happy Smile Very Happy  Very Happy Smile Very Happy 
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Rnath
Rob'sédé
Rob'sédé
avatar

Nombre de messages : 1528
Date d'inscription : 21/01/2013
Age : 45
Localisation : Dijon

MessageSujet: Re: La revue de presse de New York - Juin 2014   Jeu 26 Juin - 23:52

  
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Jel
Rob'sédé
Rob'sédé
avatar

Nombre de messages : 6638
Date d'inscription : 11/02/2011
Age : 28

MessageSujet: Re: La revue de presse de New York - Juin 2014   Ven 27 Juin - 2:00

Un grand
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
sabrinalor
Rob'sédé
Rob'sédé
avatar

Nombre de messages : 6015
Date d'inscription : 17/11/2011
Age : 48
Localisation : lorraine

MessageSujet: Re: La revue de presse de New York - Juin 2014   Ven 27 Juin - 21:44

 

_________________
 
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: La revue de presse de New York - Juin 2014   

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
La revue de presse de New York - Juin 2014
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
TheRpattzRobertPattinson.blogspot.fr | The RPattz Club :: Let s talk about RPattz :: Les archives du RPattz Kiosque :: Archives 2014-
Sauter vers: